Monday, October 9, 2017

THE MONARCHS ARE PASSING THROUGH

Another Monday. I hope you had a fantastic weekend, or at least a restful one. My subject today is butterflies. It's no secret how much I like them. Twice a year, spring and fall, we get to enjoy the Monarchs as they travel from the US to Mexico and back again. Of course I have to take pictures. This year I tried, but the mosquitoes tried to dine on me so I stayed inside mostly. Also, either the Monarchs are late or the flowers they like are early, but our pasture of flowers is almost all wilted. There were a few butterflies, but I'm showing pictures from last year, because I got only one or two new ones.



Our local newspaper also ran an article this week about how we know where the butterflies go.

In 1916 a 5-year-old boy named Fred Urquhart liked to chase the butterflies. He got to wondering what happened to them in the winter. He read books but found no answer. He grew up to be an expert on insects and earned a PhD in entomology. He got married and he and his wife came up with a plan to track the butterflies. They put tags on the butterflies. And that's how they discovered the monarchs go  to Mexico.
Credit to Lynn Seman - Texas Master Naturalist

We're kind of a rest stop for them as they pass through. The trees are filled with the colorful butterflies for a couple of days. And then they're gone.

Happy Reading. Have a great week.

I have a treat for you on Wednesday, so stop by.





14 comments:

  1. Thank you Beverly for a most wonderful post.
    I too love butterflies. I once wrote a poem entitled "Fragile As A Butterfly".

    Enjoy this new week.

    Yvonne.

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    1. Oh, I bet your poem is as lovely as the butterfly, Yvonne. Thanks. I'm glad you enjoyed it.
      A good week to you as well.

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  2. That little boy followed his dream.

    My grandmother loved butterflies, so I heard about the Monarchs often.

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    1. Yes, he did, Diane. Children are amazing.
      I think Monarchs are interesting to many people. Other butterflies are pretty too, but not noticed as much it seems.

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  3. I didn't realize they just passed through certain times of the year. I've learned something today!

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    1. Yes, that's right, Stephanie. We're fortunate to be on their flight path. The path we're in is the 300 mile wide path from Wichita Falls, TX to Eagle Pass. It takes about three weeks for them to reach Mexico.

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  4. Sorry you couldn't get great shots this year. Stupid mosquitoes.

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  5. Showed what one can do when they really want to know.

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    1. Exactly, Pat. If you want to know something, find out.

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  6. How awesome that you're in the path of the butterflies. I saw them decades ago in Santa Cruz. It was amazing!

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    1. It is exciting, Natalie. Even though I have lots of pictures of them, I still snap more when they pass through.

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  7. Your pictures are very nice :-) My daughter has visited the sanctuaries in Mexico where the monarchs migrate--she said it was like being in a cloud of orange there were so many of them! Their migration journey is an amazing story...

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    1. Thank you, Kenda. I'd love to see where the monarchs migrate. It would be awesome. Thanks for stopping by.

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