Wednesday, October 4, 2017

INSECURE WRITER'S SUPPORT GROUP

Welcome October, which means it's INSECURE WRITER'S SUPPORT GROUP DAY.



Posting: The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer - aim for a dozen new people each time. Be sure to link to this page and display your badge in your post.

Ninja Alex J. Cavanaugh is the founder of the IWSG. 

His awesome co-hosts for the October 4 posting of the IWSG are Olga Godim, Chemist Ken, Jennifer Hawes, and Tamara Narayan!

Every month, we announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG Day post. These questions may prompt you to share advice, insight, a personal experience or story. Include your answer to the question in your IWSG post or let it inspire your post if you are struggling with something to say. Remember, the question is optional.

October 4 question: Have you ever slipped any of your personal information into your characters, either by accident or on purpose?

I've been racking my brain to come up with an answer. (That's not a pretty sight, trust me.) I've looked through my books and don't really find anything personal in my characters. Except maybe for a couple of them.

In REBEL IN BLUE JEANS, Rebel loves horses. Maybe I wrote her that way because I love horses too. The difference is she had horses when she was a teen. My horses came later in life, after I was married. I fed the horses, rode the horses and loved them, the way Rebel does. I guess that counts, right? It wasn't a conscious thing.



This was my mare, Heavenly Sunrise, and her foal, many years ago. Rebel has a mare and foal. I don't think I consciously based this story on my love of horses.


And in A FAMILY FOR LEONA, the major characters are based on personal information, of what I know of the main character and supporting characters.

The girls were real people, but the story, at least partly, is from my imagination. No accident. I told their story, such as I knew it.

What about the rest of you? Good question.

Happy Reading.

16 comments:

  1. Most interesting Beverly, With me writing poetry I tend to write on what's happening in my life or NOT happening.
    Have a great October.
    Yvonne.

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    1. Thank you, Yvonne. Writing about your days and your life makes your poetry so lovely. You share a part of you with your readers.

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  2. Loved seeing how you are a part of your stories. I do put things in my stories too. My daughter is adopted and my main characters so far are adopted too. It's mostly because I think these kids need stories about themselves where it's not all about adoption.

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    1. Thank you, Natalie. Love the idea of adopted children being in your stories. My mother was a foster child, many years ago. Yes, their stories should be told. They are family. I never heard the word foster and did not know it for years.

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  3. A little bit seeps in when we really look indeed. Sometimes we consciously do or don't.

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    1. It sure does, Pat. I think our subconscious sometimes takes control. :)

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  4. You wrote what you knew and that was your horses.

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    1. Yes, Diane. I loved those horses. Hated to part with them.

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  5. You racked your brain better than I did!

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    1. Ha, ha! Sometimes it's painful, Alex. Other times not so much.

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  6. That totally counts. We give our characters our passions. And even our pets. :)

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    1. Absolutely, Chrys. I love my cats. Oh, I just remembered. I have a ghost cat in my pirate story. How could I have forgotten?

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  7. Now you see, Beverly, I begin my story with places I've visited with my family. I get my protagonist into trouble, but therein lay the fiction.

    I always wished I had a horse. The mare and foal are beautiful. Lucky you!

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    1. Places you've been make very good stories, Victoria. Trouble is good for your protagonist too. How he/she gets out of it is the fun part of writing.
      Thank you. The horses were a long time ago. I miss them.

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  8. Yes! Our characters do inherit our stuff.

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    1. They sure do, Nas. And aren't we thankful. Thanks for stopping by.

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