Wednesday, December 7, 2016

INSECURE WRITER'S SUPPORT GROUP AND TUMBLEWEEDS

Welcome Wednesday, IWSG DAY!

 
Posting: The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer - aim for a dozen new people each time. Be sure to link to this page and display the badge in your post.




 
Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

Our Twitter is @TheIWSG and hashtag #IWSG
 
Ninja Alex J. Cavanaugh is the founder of IWSG.
 
 
The question for today is: In terms of your writing career, where do you see yourself five years from now, and what's your plan to get there?

 
Interesting question. I don't look five years ahead for my writing career or any part of my life. I do good to keep up with today and maybe next week. I hope I'm still writing five years from now. I hope I've had several more novels published by then. My plan to get there is just to keep writing, as long as ideas pop into my head. I'm with some great publishers now and hope they'll like my future work. So I write and write and hope someone reads my writing. (That's a lot of hoping.)

 
I'm changing the subject for a minute. Since I'm seeing all sorts of lovely Christmas trees decorating stores and homes, it brought to mind the tree below.
 
 
Have you ever seen a Tumbleweed Christmas Tree?
No? Then take a look at this one.
 
 
"This unique Chandler, Arizona, tradition began in 1957, when Chandler resident Earl Barnum raised the idea of a tumbleweed tree after he saw a similar one in Indiana built out of cone-shaped chicken wire with pine boughs stuck in the holes. Many members of the community helped create the first tree in Chandler using tumbleweeds that they gathered from around town. Little did these folks know that they were the first to do such a thing and that it would continue as an annual Christmas tradition from then on. In fact, Chandler is the only city in the southwestern United States that has such a tree."
 
I find these trees fascinating. In fact, one day I was out walking when a tumbleweed rolled across the path in front of me. Well, as a writer, I knew I had a story. So I turned that tumbleweed into a picture book/early reader for young readers.
 
 
 
 I did decorate a tumbleweed one time. They have sharp spikes on them, so it's kind of hard without wounding your fingers. Most kids I ask if they're seen a tumbleweed say, "No." Now you have.

32 comments:

  1. A great post Beverly I enjoyed The Tumbleweed Christmas.
    Yvonne.

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    1. Thanks, Yvonne. The Tumbleweed Tree fascinates me.

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  2. Who knew tumbleweed could be so useful. Neat indeed. Yep, just keep on writing. That is my plan.

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    1. People come up with amazing ideas, Pat, and can find the beauty in most anything.

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  3. I'm surprised the city of Albuquerque never put up a tumbleweed tree. We certainly had enough of them. During the windy season, I'd bring home several every week trapped under my truck. I guess we could've made our own tumbleweed tree.

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    1. Looks like a Tumbleweed Tree would be a good tourist attraction, Diane. Maybe the people in Albuquerque think it would be too much work. :)

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  4. Cool idea for a tree.
    Don't feel bad, I don't really have a plan either.

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    1. Good to know I'm not alone, Alex. I pretty much just take one day at a time and don't plan too far ahead.

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  5. That tumbleweed Christmas tree turned out great! Now I want a tumbleweed to decorate. :D

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    1. It is neat, Chrys. Be careful if you decorate one. They have sharp thorns.

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  6. I think with so much of our success out of our control that the "just keep swinning" approach is a good one. And I had never seen that tree, in spite of having an aunt, uncle and cousin who lived in Chandler for a couple decades (the aunt and uncle have retired farther south and cousin is in a different Phoenix burb now).

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    1. You're right, Hart. We have little control of some things so do what we can and see what happens. Thanks for stopping by.

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  7. I love that tree! What a perfect one for Texas. And, of course, it's great that you were inspired to write the story based on that tree.

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    1. It would be the perfect tree for Texas, Lee, but I can't recall ever seeing one in this area, except the small one I made years ago.

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  8. Lovely tree and lovely how it inspired you!

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    1. Thanks, Jamie. We never know where ideas will come from. Sometimes the weirdest places. Thank you for stopping by.

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  9. Yes, now I have (though I'm no longer a kid)! I hope to still be writing for a good living in the next 5 years. Children's fiction for clients and for myself.

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    1. Ha, ha, yes you have, Claudine. Very good goals. I bet you'll achieve them.

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  10. What a cool idea for a tree! Gives new meaning to ideas being everywhere:)

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    1. It is unique, Karin. I'd like to see it live. Yep, ideas are all around us. We just have to see them.

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  11. Ooh, the five year question... I'm hoping to have a few more books out. I'm also hoping to survive four kids in college. :D

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    1. I bet you will have more books out, S. A. Now about the four kids in college ... You will survive, and it should be exciting. Stay tough.

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  12. I admit to being mystified by tumbleweeds. Where do they come from? Where do they go? How do they stick together like that? I bet your book does a great job of introducing them to kids. Have a lovely weekend!

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    1. I don't know all the answers, Lexa, but tumbleweeds are fascinating. Haven't seen any for a while. A lovely weekend to you, as well.

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  13. I can't wait to read all the great books you're going to put out. My mom and I were discussing this at lunch--once you reach a certain age, you just write because you love it. You don't have this grandiose "plan" for your career trajectory. it's just all about the love for putting words on the page.

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    1. Ah, you're too kind, Stephanie. I hope there will be more stories ahead. You're right about age making a difference in goals. The long-term writing isn't what I think about. I hope I have many years left here on earth, but I'm also realistic about my age. (I'm not telling, but I have great-grandkids.) So I write for the love of telling a story that's in my heart. Have a wonderful weekend.

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  14. Tumbleweed Christmas tree. Just whn you think you've seen it all, along comes a tumbleweed Christmas tree. Thanks for sharing it with us.

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    1. Ha, ha! Yes, Stephen, you never know what's lurking out there waiting to be discovered.

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  15. I don't recall ever seeing a Tumbleweed Christmas tree. How cool! Loved your book Tumbleweed Christmas! Hope others pick it up and enjoy it for the holiday season too. :)

    Wishing you lots and lots of happy writing days ahead. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. Thanks, Jess. I'm glad you loved my book and hope others do as well. Happy Reading to you too.

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  16. It's good to live in the moment and not look too far ahead.

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    1. You're right, Kelly. We never know what tomorrow will bring.

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