Monday, October 3, 2016

WORTH FORGIVING REVIEW and #INKRIPPLES

Quote of the week: We cannot change our past. We can not change the fact that people act in a certain way. We can not change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. Charles R. Swindoll

A few weeks ago we did a cover reveal for Author Janet K. Brown's latest novel, WORTH FORGIVING. Today, I'd like to share my thoughts of the story with you, a good way to start the new week, I think.




WORTH FORGIVING: Book 2 in The Wharton Rock Series, Review

By Janet K. Brown

 

 

Do you have a friend, acquaintance, or family member that once was in prison? What happened when they were released? How were they accepted once they moved back into the community and tried to make a new life for themselves?

 

I have no personal experience with such a situation and never thought about it, until I read Author Janet K. Brown’s latest novel, WORTH FORGIVING,  Book 2 in The Wharton Rock Series. Boy, did she open my eyes to what an ex-convict faces. Maybe not all of them, but I imagine a percentage of them experience the same problems that Katie, the character in the story, has to deal with.

 

WORTH FORGIVING is a story of hope, forgiveness, and family. Janet K. Brown has a knack for creating characters that are so real, I could feel Katie’s pain and disappointment as her plans and dreams for her after prison life all went wrong. I wanted to help Larry, the man Katie could love if she wasn’t so damaged, solve his dilemma about God’s plans for him. I wished I could shake them and tell them what to do.

 

I recommend WORTH FORGIVING for everyone that enjoys a story about family, not a perfect family, but one that is trying to do God’s will in their lives. It’s a sad story; it’s a happy story; it’s a story that will stay with you for a long time and make you appreciate your own life.

 

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Since today is the first Monday of the month, it's also #InkRipples Day. #InkRipples is a monthly meme created by Kai Strand, Mary Waibel, and Katie L. Carroll. They post on the first Monday of every month with a new topic. They're all authors, but you don't have to be to participate.


The topic for October is masks. Since I know nothing about masks, I did the logical thing. I Googled masks. I found a lot of information, but here's just a little. Check Wikipedia for more.

The word "mask" appeared in English in the 1530s.

The oldest masks that have been discovered are 9,000 years old, being held by the Musée "Bible et Terre Sainte" (Paris), and the Israel Museum (Jerusalem). Most probably the practice of masking is much older – the earliest known anthropomorphic artwork is circa 30,000–40,000 years old– but insofar as it involved the use of war-paint, leather, vegetative material, or wooden masks, the masks probably have not been preserved (they are visible only in paleolithic cave drawings, of which dozens have been preserved) and are used in rituals or ceremonies, or for protection or ornaments. At the neanderthal Roche-Cotard site in France, a flintstone likeness of a face was found which is about 35,000 years old, but it is not clear that it was intended as a mask.

Other than what I read at Wikipedia, I know nothing.

Here are some examples of modern day masks. They'd be good for Halloween parties. And that's all I have to say about masks.


 
There are lots more.
 
If you want to participate in #InkRipples, you can spread your own ripples by blogging about the topic any day of the month that fits your schedule. Just be sure to include links back to the three of them (Katie, Kai, and Mary). Use any of the images on their sites. Have fun.
 
 
The topics for the rest of 2016 are:
 
November:  Heritage
 
December:  Cookies
 

Happy Reading!



12 comments:

  1. I think the qoute I can and have to relate to.
    I enjoyed the review on the book and hope it is a resounding success.
    Yvonne.

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    1. The quote does make a lot of sense, Yvonne. Thanks. I'm happy you enjoyed the review.

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  2. Masks come in all forms indeed. A story that sticks with the reader long after is a good one for sure.

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    1. They sure do, Pat. Yes, some stories keep coming back to me from time to time. They've left an impression I can't forget.

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  3. Fascinating info on masks, Beverly. Thanks for sharing. I'm glad you participated this month because I didn't think to look up masks to learn the history. And Janet's book sounds like an important one. Prisoners are often overlooked and pushed aside while incarcerated and after they've served their time.

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    1. Since I know nothing about masks I decided to learn, Kai. A lot of interesting information is out there.
      Janet's book made me realize that even when a convict is freed, they sometimes are still looked down on by some people.

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  4. Those are some old masks. I guess we've been hiding behind them all of our lives.

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    1. There are a lot of neat masks, Alex. I never thought about them. Maybe we do hide behind our masks, even if they're not tangible ones, but in our own minds.

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  5. This does sound like a powerful book. Thanks for sharing your review. Interesting information about masks!
    ~Jess

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    1. The book opened my eyes to what the afterlife of ex-cons can be, not always the lived happily ever after we like to think. Yeah, I learned a little about masks.

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  6. Cool info about masks! You can learn so much by simply searching and reading, and the Internet puts so much (literally) at our fingertips.

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    1. That's true, Katie. The Internet has just about everything, making it easier to learn facts than going to the library. Amazing.

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