Monday, September 5, 2016

INK RIPPLES BANNED BOOKS

Quote for the week: Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy. Norman Vincent Peale

September, one of my favorite months. The beginning of Autumn. School begins. New sports and activities begin. A busy month. It's also a new Ink Ripples. The topic for this month is Banned Books.

 
Ink Ripples is a monthly meme created by Kai Strand, Mary Waibel, and Katie L. Caroll. They post on the first Monday of every month with a new topic. They're all authors, but you don't have to be to participate.
 
The idea of "InkRipples is to toss a word, idea, image, whatever into the inkwell and see what kind of ripples it makes. You can blog about the topic any day of the month. Or you can share your thoughts on social media using the hashtag #InkRipples. Just be sure to link back to Kai, Mary, or Katie.
 
The topic for September is Banned Books. I imagine there are a lot of thoughts about this. Banned books? I've really paid little attention to this idea of banned books, but now I'm finding the subject interesting. Who decides to ban a certain book? Why? So, I went to the ALA Web site to find some answers. If you've never been there, this is a good time to pay a visit. They have lots of information, along with activities for Banned Books Week, September 25-October 1, 2016. Go here.
 
What do you think about banned books?
 
The topics for the rest of 2016 are:
 
October:    Masks
November: Heritage
December: Cookies
 
Happy Reading!
 

22 comments:

  1. I love the qoute , it hit me hard as I have a couple of things that I certainly do need confidence. I shall remember this qoute.
    Wonderful post and most interesting to read Beverly.
    Yvonne.

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    1. I thought it was a good quote, Yvonne. Will keep you in my thoughts and prayers that you'll have the confidence you need.

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  2. Many banned books I find it weird that they were banned, a few though deserved to be if they were filled with hate speech and stuff.

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    1. I guess it's a tough decision to make, Pat, and a lot of different things are taken into consideration. I'm going to check on the books that are banned and see what the objection to them is.

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  3. Good idea to go to ALA and see what they have to say about banned books. Thanks, Beverly.

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    1. I think so too, C Lee. I really know little about banned books. Guess it's time I learned.

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  4. I think banning books just makes people want to read them more.

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    1. I agree, Kelly. In fact, now I want to take a look at some of them. I just finished reading The Giver again and wonder why it was banned.

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  5. I don't think there should be banned books. Period.

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    1. I agree, Chrys. Doesn't that go against our Constitutional rights of freedom of speech. No one has to read it if they don't like it.

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  6. I think quite often it's to "protect children?" I know some schools have banned books from their libraries. One school banned Anne Frank because the subject matter was "too depressing." That's just ridiculous!

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    1. I agree, Stephanie. We should be able to read whatever we want to and make our own decisions. For children, it's a great opportunity to discuss the subject.

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  7. There are so many crazy reasons that books have been banned. Many of the banned requests come from a place of ignorance. I think it's important to recognize these books and share them with more people.

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    1. So do I, Katie. We can learn so much from books, both good and bad. We should be able to read what we want to. Isn't that violating our constitutional rights?

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  8. What an amazing quote, Beverly! And one I needed to read today. I'm going to keep it handy!

    I don't like the idea of banned books myself. All books should be available, and readers can choose whether or not they want to read any given book.

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    1. I'm glad you like it, Karin. It has a good message, for sure.
      Exactly. Why should others tell us what to read. None of their business.

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  9. I think banning books is a great marketing tool. I wish I could get some of my books banned. :)

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    1. Ha, ha, Kathleen. I had thought the same thing. A banned book makes the Times New York best seller's list. A dream. Go ahead, ban mine.

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  10. It is CRAZY to read some of the reasons people have for challenging books! And Kathleen is right. Nothing sells a book better than it getting banned from library shelves!

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  11. I have always been curious about banned books. Banning them seems to have the opposite effect- as more people want to read them. I think it is crazy that people want to tell other people what they can read. I have read a lot of banned books and I couldn't find a reason people shouldn't read them. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. Yes, they can ban my books anytime, Jess. I know what you mean. That's the opinion of those who judge the books, which doesn't mean others should not read them.

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