Tuesday, April 19, 2016

A TO Z CHALLENGE: "P" Poetry of the 50s and INK RIPPLES

 
For the letter P, we're looking at Poetry (well, one poem). Since Poetry is also the topic for this month's Ink Ripples, I'm posting it here, as well. Enjoy.
 

When I was in 8th grade I wrote a poem entitled STARS for my English class. To my surprise, the teacher liked it so much she sent it to a high school anthology and it was published. At the time, I wasn't all that interested in poetry, but now, many years later, I'm kind of excited about it. The poem below is my first published work. In the 50s, not telling exactly which year.

STARS
by Beverly Stowe
Zundelowitz Jr. H. School
Wichita Falls, Texas
 
I often lie awake at night,
Watching stars that are so bright.
They sparkle and twinkle in the cool night air,
And look like ladies with lovely golden hair.
You see the little dipper and the big dipper too,
Away up in the deep dark blue.
But then come the morning rays of light
And all the star are gone until tonight.
 
 
 
INK RIPPLES
 
#InkRipples is a monthly meme created by Kai Strand, Mary Waibel, and Katie L. Carroll. They post on the first Monday of every month with a new topic. They're all authors, but you don't have to be to participate.
 
 
The idea of #InkRipples is to toss a word, idea, image, whatever into the inkwell and see what kind of ripples it makes. You can spread your own ripples by blogging about the topic any day of the month that fits your schedule. Just be sure to include links back to Katie, Kai, and Mary. Thanks.
 
Or you can simply share your thoughts on social media using the hashtag #InkRipples.
 
There is no wrong way to do #InkRipples (with the exception of following basic human decency!) Feel free to use any of the meme's images (created by the wonderful Mary Waibel).
 
So, join the fun. My post for April is the above poem.
 
The topics for the rest of 2016 are:
 
May: Memories
June: Movies
July: Inspiration
August: Guilty Pleasures
September: Banned Books
October: Masks
November: Heritage
December: Cookies

Happy Reading and Writing!


14 comments:

  1. That teacher probably encouraged you to continue writing. I'm in the InkRipples, and I love the idea of being able to choose the day that suits your schedule

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    1. She probably did, lee, but that was so long ago I can't remember. Being able to choose your own day for Ink Ripples works better than having to post on Mondays, for me. It is fun too.

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  2. You were talented even back then! In high school, a teacher assigned us to write a limerick. I turned mine in and heard nothing. The next day, I started hearing she was reading it to her other classes as an example of what she wanted. She never said a word to me (although she gave me an A), but that was the most encouraging thing any teacher ever said about my writing. I ran into her ten years ago and told her about it--she had no recollection, but I was stressing how much of a difference she'd made to a young writer and I think it really made her feel good!

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    1. It's really weird, too, Stephanie. I was not a reader. I only wrote the poem to keep from flunking English, at least I thought that was the reason. Teachers like yours are awesome. Sometimes they don't realize what an influence they have over their students. When I meet former students today, it's so awesome if they say something nice about being in my class. :)

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  3. Wonderful poem Beverly, I hated poetry when I was at school...lol
    Yvonne.

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    1. Thanks, Yvonne. I didn't care for poetry either, or reading for that matter. I did them because they were assigned.

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  4. Great verse indeed your 8th grade self wrote. Teachers like that really are the good ones

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    1. Eighth grade was a long time ago, Pat. Another lifetime. Sometimes I have flashbacks of things that happened. Teachers like that one are necessary for children to learn and grow. She was a good one, for sure.

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  5. I've had many teacher who made a difference in my life in one way or another...even if by some tiny gesture. I love your poem. and so glad you had such a wonderful teacher who saw an amazing talent.

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    1. That's wonderful, Rebecca. Sometimes the little things are just as important as the big things. Thank you. So am I. I wish I could see her today and thank her, but I imagine she's gone home by now. Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. Lovely poem--congratulations all these years later for getting it published :-) I echo others when I say the encouragement we receive as children goes a long way into our adult lives. My fifth grade teacher was my inspiration, such an encourager. Later as a widow. she ended up marrying my uncle who was by then a widower. I loved inviting her into the family!

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    1. Thank you, Kenda. I taught fifth grade for ten years, and it's so neat seeing my former students, now grown, with children of their own. Some have even said nice things about me. What a wonderful story you have about your teacher and uncle.

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  7. Lovely, Beverly! I love poetry and have several written long ago though never published:)

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    1. Thanks, Karin. Maybe one day you will publish them.

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