Monday, April 27, 2015

A TO Z CHALLENGE - "W" IS FOR WHITE-TAILED DEER

White-tailed deer are the smallest members of the North American deer family. They are found from Southern Canada to South America. Only the male deer (buck) grow antlers. White-tailed deer are herbivores and come out mostly at dusk and dawn to feed. The female (doe) has one to three fawns, usually in May or June. I think the reason I'm not seeing many does now is because they either have new babies or soon will have. Since bobcats, mountain lions, and coyotes like to dine on deer, especially the young, white-tails use their speed to escape them. If you've ever watched one sail over a fence, it's amazing. They can leap as high as 10 feet and as far as 30 feet in one leap. Yep, I've seen them do it.

Here are some photos I've taken. The darker ones are from a night time motion camera that no longer works.
 
You can see his antlers here. This is a young buck.
 
Here you can see a little about the tail. When they run, they hold the tail up and it's like a white flag.
I think of these animals as "my" deer, but they really belong to no one.
 
 

20 comments:

  1. They certainly looks impressive Beverly, Thanks for sharing.
    Yvonne.

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    1. They are lovely animals, Yvonne. You're welcome. I have lots of pictures. :)

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  2. They are beautiful animals for sure. Spring and fall at dawn and dusk they move a lot and it's not uncommon to see them at the roadsides. Where there's one, there's almost always more. Drive carefully.

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    1. I know. Melanie. Once in a while we see them run over on the highway. Wish I could keep them in the pasture.

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  3. Wow, I knew they could jump high, but not that far. Need one big fence to keep them out

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    1. Sure do, Pat. Our 4 ft. barbed wire fence doesn't slow them down. During hunting season I tell them to stay in our pasture. They don't listen.

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  4. I get to see "mine" often in our yard hopping over fences as well, Beverly. They are fun to watch!

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    1. You have deer too, Karin. Wonderful. I sometimes watch them from my writing room window. Don't get a lot of writing done that way.

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  5. Thirty feet? Wow, that's a heck of a long jump.

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  6. Deer always make me smile. I think it's sad that they can be hunted. :(

    Thirty feet? That's impressive!

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    1. I hate hunting season, Chrys. A butcher and taxidermist lives just down the road from us. I can't drive by his business in the fall/winter.

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  7. That's a good tip for spotting white-tailed deer! I never knew the difference before.

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    1. Yes, Stephanie, and the baby follows the mama's white tail.

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  8. Such magical animals your deer are. Wow, I had no idea they could jump so high and so far! That's amazing.

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    1. They are fascinating to watch, but a bit shy, though some people have been able to get close to them and feed them. These always run away.

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  9. Beautiful animals. I've never seen deer out in the wild. I might have only seen them in zoos.

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    1. They are lovely, so dainty with long slender necks and legs.

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  10. We have a lot of these guys around us. I've even turned around from my desk because I've felt someone watching me and a deer will be peering the back window. "Come play!"

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    1. What fun. Play with the deer. They are adorable. :)

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