Saturday, April 25, 2015

A TO Z CHALLENGE - "V" IS FOR VARIABLE FLYING FOX

The Island orVariable Flying Fox is a medium sized fruit bat. They have a wingspan of about 4 ft. and weigh around 1.5 lbs. There are 16 subspecies and they are found in the Andaman and Maldives Islands; New Guinea through Indonesia to Vietnam and Thailand, and adjacent islands; Philippines. Solomon Islands - Learn more at: http://lubee.org/bats/our-bats/island-flying-fox/

 
 

 
Rare Variable Flying Fox pup twins with mom. Photo credit: S. Mulder, Lubee Bat Conservancy
 
Last year the Lubee Bat Conservancy in Gainesville, Florida welcomed twelve bat pups, including the rare birth of twins by mother Variable Flying Fox "Charisma." This organization is dedicated to conserving "fruit and nectar" bats because these animals are vital to pollination and seed dispersal in many of the world's jungles. The evolutionary origins of bats are a subject of much debate but they are most certainly NOT flying rodents. Once thought to be more closely related to shrews and hedgehogs, recent genetic evidence suggests bats may be more closely related to carnivores like bears, dogs and cats. (Information from http://www.zooborns.com/zooborns/2010/03/baby-bat-pups-at-lubee-bat-conservancy.html )

18 comments:

  1. Look at the size of the eyes on them! They're adorable. I miss the bats around here. They kept our mosquito population well under control. Unfortunately, there's a disease going around (white nose) that's decimating the bat population.

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    1. They do have big eyes, Melanie. That's sad. I hope some kind of remedy for the disease can be found to stop it before they're all gone.

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    2. I think in our neighbourhood, in addition to the white nose disease, the places the bats roosted in the church steeple over the road have been blocked off so they can't get in anymore.

      In the UK and Europe, bats are a protected species.

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    3. Sounds like they should be protected everywhere. Maybe they will be.

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  2. My what a creature Beverly, I have never heard of this one. Great post.

    Enjoy your week-end.
    Yvonne.

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    1. They're new to me too, Yvonne. I thought the babies were so cute.

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  3. A cat that can fly, that would be all the cocky little buggers need lol

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    1. Yeah, right, Pat. Then the cats sure enough would run the household. As if they don't already. :)

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  4. Those creep me out! I don't even like looking at them.

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    1. You know, Stephanie, I didn't like them at first, but when I read their story and learned they are good I changed my mind.

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  5. Thank you for this one! I love bats!!! I love in Florida but I never heard of the Lubee Bat Conservancy. I need to go there! :D

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    1. Oh, that would be great, Chrys. I bet it's an interesting place to visit.

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  6. This was a great post. Bats are so important to us and we've been neglectful of their well-being with our pesticides. These guys are amazing.

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    1. Thanks, Lee. At least now they're doing something to help the bats.

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  7. Fruit bats are really cool. And they grow so big.
    That trio in the picture is almost cute.

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    1. Yes, Alex, they are almost cute, for bats. :)

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  8. What an amazing animal. Their wingspan is awesome! They are so cute. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. They are cute little critters, Jess. Such big eyes.

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