Monday, October 20, 2014

RUDE DUDE SPOTLIGHT - SURVIVE AND THRIVE - DARBY'S POST

Monday Musings.
This week is starting out busy. Do I have some treats for you today. Let's get started.
 
First, meet Author Tim J. Myers and his latest children's book
RUDE DUDE'S BOOK OF FOOD
 
BLURB:



It's amazing!  Ancient Mongols actually did put raw meat under their saddles to "tenderize" it!  And fortune cookies--gasp--don't come from China!  Tim J. Myers' Rude Dude's Book of Food is just out, a humorous, anecdote-filled history of popular foods (hamburgers, chocolate, etc.) tied to the Common Core and intended for upper-elementary/ middle-school students.  You know you're hungry--dig in!



From Rude Dude's Book of Food:

Dude, these are amazing times—you know it, I know it, and the babies in their strollers know it. But historians a thousand years from now won’t talk about computers or space shuttles or cable TV. They’ll call our time the Age of the Hamburger. Because it’s for dang sure that’s one of the coolest things to happen in the last couple centuries.


The average American eats three burgers a week. I guess that makes me two or three average Americans. I'm like, run a burger up the flagpole and I’ll salute. Then I’ll climb up after it. Gajillions of people feel the same. Hamburgers appear on American menus more than any other food. There was even a French chef in the White House—French, I'm saying, the gourmets of the world—who specialized in milk shakes and hamburgers. And at any time, one out of three Americans has downed a burger in the past 24 hours. I've read that all the burgers McDonald's has sold add up to 16 for every person on the planet today.


Wicked lot of ground beef, eh?


As you might expect, the popularity of hamburgers is causing some problems too. I'll talk about that in the final chapter. For now, let's just see how the whole thing happened.


I figure the sacred evolution of the hamburger began back when ancient cave-people knocked on animals with clubs and became meat-eaters. And somewhere along the line, some all-thumbs guy dropped his zebra haunch in the fire. Then he started crying and blubbering, then was dumb enough to snatch it out, and burned his fingers, and stuck them in his mouth to cool them off—and realized his fingertips tasted really, really delicious. (Let’s hope he didn't get confused and accidentally invent cannibalism). So people learned to cook their meat...
 

 
I didn't know that. Did you?
 
Watch those hamburgers, people.
 
 
 
www.TimMyersStorySong.com
Tim J. Myers is a writer, songwriter, storyteller, and senior lecturer at Santa Clara University. His children’s books--12 out and three on the way--have won recognition from the New York Times, NPR, and the Smithsonian. He’s published over 130 poems, won a first prize in a poetry contest judged by John Updike, has two books of adult poetry out, and won a major prize in science fiction. He won the West Coast Songwriters Saratoga Chapter Song of the Year and the 2012 SCBWI Magazine Merit Award for Fiction. Find him at www.TimMyersStorySong.com or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/TimJMyers1.
 


 
 
Next we have the SURVIVE AND THRIVE BLOG HOP
 

 
Monday, October 20, 2014
 
The blogfest is meant to bring awareness of disease prevention and early detection regarding medical conditions that may be averted or treated if caught in the early stages. Our desire is to motivate people to go in for early screening, and if a condition is caught early and treated, then our world just became a little better place to live.
 
I have a particular cause that is dear to my heart, well, actually more than one, I'd like to share with you. Diabetes, Alzheimer's, kidney failure, and heart disease. I know, I told you.
 
Diabetes: Diabetes leads to other problems, so please, please keep track of your blood sugar count, eat healthy meals, take your medication if prescribed, and exercise.
 
Alzheimer's: This disease robs you of your mind.  There's very little worse than someone you've known for years looking at you as though you're stranger. Many factors play into the disease: age, genetics, environment, lifestyle.. Some risk factors can be changed.
 
Kidney failure: Manage your diabetes and blood pressure.
 
Heart Disease:  There are many causes. Again, eat healthy, exercise, don't smoke.
 
Early diagnosis is important, so keep those doctor appointments.
 
 
One more important matter today. Stop by Darby Karchut's blog where she's spotlighting STAR OF THE TEAM. We love comments.
 
Happy Reading.
 



29 comments:

  1. Good morning! I sadly know all too well how bad Alzheimer's/dementia is. My grandpa died of Alzheimer's and my grandma of dementia. Horrible disease! We need to find a cure!

    my blog:morgankatz505.blogspot.com

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    1. I know how you feel, Morgan. My husband had Alzheimer's. I pray that one day there will be a cure.

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  2. I probably don't eat three hamburgers in a year but the book sounds really good. If I was still teaching health, I would buy it and use it as an entertaining interlude during nutrition units.
    Alzheimers runs in my husband's family and he's worried about it.

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    1. I taught 5th grade health along with science, Susan. It would be a great book to use.
      I seldom eat any red meat now. Yes, I worry about the hereditary part too, for my sons. Maybe soon they'll be able to cure or at least control it.

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  3. Sound advice....yet it's the same thing we keep hearing and people are constantly looking for short cuts. It's often the simple things that make the biggest impact to our health.

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    1. So true, Jay. Sometimes, we think we know best or it won't happen to us.

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  4. Hi Beverly, long time no see. Early detection is crucial these days, especially with all the technology and trained personnel available. So many diseases can be treated or managed if caught early. Great post and thanks for sharing with us!

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    1. Hi Stephen. Yes, it's been a while. :) It is amazing what doctors can do these days. We still have a ways to go in some areas. Thanks.

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  5. I think I'll invest in a saddle and buy cheaper cuts of meat. No, wait! That would mean I'd have to find a horse. Too much overhead. I'll stick with eating less meat and choosing the already tender pieces! Great post. Loved the bits about how many hamburgers the average American eats. That's a lot of hamburger.

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    1. Haha, C Lee. Horses are expensive. I miss ours though. I used to eat hamburgers, before I got smart. Now, maybe one or two a year.

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  6. Hi, Bev,

    Thanks for participating in the hop.... I couldn't agree more. Eating right and exercising regularly is one of the key factors in good health. Testing and early detection is crucial as well...

    WOW... that is a LOT OF BURGERS.... We need to watch that, especially to keep our health in check!

    Fun book though, Congrats Tim!

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    1. Hi Michael. Health is very important to me and I'm delighted to be a part of the hop. Hopefully people will listen.

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  7. Managing one's weight helps with several of those.

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    1. And thanks for participating in the blogfest!

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    2. You're absolutely right, Alex. A healthy diet can prevent many illnesses. You're welcome. I'm glad to be a part of the blogfest. It's a worthwhile cause.

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  8. I have not had a typical hamburger in over 20 years. I am the minority. I have made my own hamburgers but I don't place it on a bun. I ate 4 this year like that with cheese, tomatoes, onion and cucumbers. A good diet, no smoking and exercise which doesn't have to be 3 hrs a day of major cardio really helps. My mom has vascular dementia so I understand the sadness of that disease and I am hypoglycemic so no sugar, starch or caffeine

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    1. Good for you, Birgit. Yes, they used to tell us that bread was the staff of life. Turns out that's not necessarily true. :) Keep up the good work.

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  9. Not me on the three hamburgers. I might eat one every other week though.

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    1. That doesn't sound too bad, T. Powell. Moderation is good in most everything. :)

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  10. My aunt has dementia and it's really sad. She was a teacher and speaks several languages fluidly. So much of that is lost now.

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    1. Yes, L. Diane. Dementia is one of the saddest illnesses to me. Hopefully some day they'll have a cure.

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  11. All the diseases you mentioned are important to be aware of. Alzheimer's robbed me of my mother too soon. It comes on so slowly. You try to explain away the clues. By the time Alzheimer's is diagnosed, it's full blown. Losing one's mind is terrifying.

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    1. Alzheimer's is horrible, Diane. My husband got to where he didn't even know who I was. Showing him wedding pictures made no difference. Sad.

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  12. That book sounds fun; I bet my kids would like it! And mmm, hamburgers.

    Great reminders on health issues. All those are very serious.

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    1. You're probably right, Shannon. I remember when hamburgers were on the school lunch menu. I don't imagine they are these days.
      Yes, there are so many issues we need to be aware of.

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    2. The book sounds like it will be a lot of fun to read. Cool cover. Thanks for sharing about it. I had a hamburger patty for dinner. I'm fine with skipping the bun. : )

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  13. You know, Susanne, they say to leave off the bread. I don't eat nearly as much as I used to. Meat and a salad make a great meal, in my opinion. And then there's the dessert, my weakness. :)

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  14. Hi Beverly - I'm not keen on hamburgers ... but do enjoy a home-made one. I eat a good mix of foods ... bread and I don't agree, and I've always loved vegetables and fish .. too much meat is too much! Cheers Hilary

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    1. Eating a balanced diet is the key I think, cutting down on carbs and sugar (my favorite). Other foods have protein too, besides meat. We used to think nothing of eating a hamburger, until we learned about calories and salt and etc. :)

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