Monday, July 23, 2012

MEMOIRS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND Review

Quote for the week:  That it will never come again is what makes life so sweet.  Emily Dickinson

Did you have an imaginary friend when you were young? A lot of children do. I just finished reading a story about one special child and his imaginary friend, by Matthew Dicks, also writing as Matthew Green. Here's a little about the author from Good Reads:

My name is Matthew Dicks. I am a writer and a teacher.

In the spring of 2008, under the guidance of my remarkable agent, Taryn Fagerness, I sold my first novel, SOMETHING MISSING, to Broadway Books, an imprint of Doubleday, and thus made one of my childhood dreams come true. SOMETHING MISSING was published in August of 2009 and has since been translated into six different languages.

My career as an author was born.

One year later, in the fall of 2010, I published my second novel, UNEXPECTEDLY, MILO.

My third novel, MEMOIRS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND, will publish in the US in August of 2012. It can already be found in bookstores in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa and has been translated into 14 languages worldwide.

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Wow! Fourteen languages. Amazing. Now, I'd like to share my thoughts on this lovely story with you.







MEMOIRS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND (Review)

By Matthew Dicks


Many children have an imaginary friend. Whether they’re lonesome and are looking for a friend, or they’re shy and don’t relate well to others, or they’re creative and imagine a character like they read about in books, their make-believe friend is just as real to them as a flesh and blood person.

Author Matthew Dicks has written a story about Budo, who has been alive for 5 years, quite a long time for imaginary friends to exist. In MEMOIRS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND, Max is a child that is different to other kids. People confuse Max, so he imagines Budo. Told from Budo’s pov, he sometimes seems so real I forgot he actually was in the mind of Max. Seeing his boy, Max’s parents and teacher’s through Budo’s eyes brings a whole new perspective to the reasons a child might create a friend that only he can see, hear, and talk to. And when the unthinkable happens (no, I’m not going to give away the story) Budo’s reaction shows just how real “imaginary” can be. At least it does to me. The heartache a child who is different suffers, the friendship between Budo and Max, and the fact that what happens to Max is happening to many of our children today make this a book that every school library, public library, and even private homes will want on their shelves.

MEMOIRS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND deals with bullying, family, friendship, and trust. It isn’t easy being an imaginary friend, knowing that someday your child will no longer need you and you’ll cease to exist. Budo almost seems human at times as he attempts to understand what’s happening around him. The author has written a story that may make you remember an imaginary friend you once had, perhaps not so long ago.

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ARC courtesy of St. Martin’s Press and Net Galley

Happy Reading and Writing


11 comments:

  1. Bev, this sounds so sweet and sad at the same time. Adding it to my list.

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  2. Very cool! I have a free short story ebook called the Imaginary Friend and it is about what happens to imaginary friends when kids don't need them any more. This story sounds right up my alley. :)

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  3. It is both sweet and sad, Darby. I really liked Budo. And Max is portrayed so well.

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  4. I have your story on my iPad, Kelly. Looking forward to reading it. The number of books on my iPad floweth over. But they're there and someday ... :)

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  5. So thrilled to hear that you enjoyed the book! Thanks so much for sharing my story with your readers. I absolutely love the idea of introducing an author before reviewing the book. Get to know the person, then hear about the book. You've got yourself a new reader!

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  6. So thrilled to hear that you enjoyed the book! Thanks so much for sharing my story with your readers. I absolutely love the idea of introducing an author before reviewing the book. Get to know the person, then hear about the book. You've got yourself a new reader!

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  7. Thank you for writing such a lovely story, Mattyd, and for stopping by. Yes, I think most readers like to know a bit about the author, I know I do.

    Best of luck with your work.

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  8. Hi, Beth. The story has moments where you laugh, moments where you cry, and a little bit of everything in between.

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  9. This is a poignant story from the brief glimpse you've given us. Lovely and one I'd like to read. It's on that ever-growing list I keep talking about.

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  10. LOL. I can picture your reading list now, C Lee. It looks a lot like mine. The story is both sweet and sad and will touch your heart.

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